Karen Majalian | Brookline Real Estate, Boston Real Estate, Newton Real Estate


A "lowball" homebuying proposal is unlikely to do you any favors, particularly if you want to acquire your dream residence as quickly as possible. In fact, after you submit a lowball offer, it may be only a matter of time before you receive a "No" from a home seller.

When it comes to buying a house, it helps to prepare a competitive offer. That way, you can increase the likelihood of getting a seller to accept your home offer and speed up the homebuying journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you avoid the risk of submitting a lowball offer on your dream residence.

1. Analyze the Housing Market

Are you searching for a house in a buyer's or seller's market? Are homes selling quickly in the current real estate market? And are houses selling at, above or below their initial asking prices? These are just some of the questions that homebuyers need to consider as they assess the real estate sector.

With a diligent approach to buying a house, a homebuyer can become a real estate market expert. This buyer can assess a wide assortment of housing market data, and by doing so, gain the insights that he or she needs to submit a competitive offer on any residence.

2. Understand a Home's Condition

A home purchase is one of the biggest transactions that an individual will complete over the course of his or her lifetime. As such, the decision to submit an offer on a house should not be taken lightly.

To make the best-possible choice, it helps to look at all of the available information about a residence. You should review a home listing closely and attend a home showing. In many instances, it may be beneficial to check out a house a few times to get an up-close look at it before you submit an offer.

The condition of a home will play a major role in how much you are willing to offer to acquire a residence. Therefore, you should learn as much as possible about a house's condition. And if you feel comfortable with a home, you should be ready to submit an offer that will match a seller's expectations.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

Hiring a real estate agent generally is a good idea, particularly for a homebuyer who wants to reduce the risk of submitting a lowball offer on a house. A real estate agent can help a homebuyer prepare a competitive offer, as well as ensure that a buyer can enjoy a seamless home transaction.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will allocate the necessary time and resources to help you analyze a house. He or she will even offer homebuying recommendations and teach you everything you need to know about the homebuying cycle.

Avoid the temptation to submit a lowball offer on a house – use the aforementioned tips, and you can submit a competitive proposal to acquire your dream residence.


Ready to launch a search for your dream home? Ultimately, you'll want to do everything possible to streamline your home search to boost your chances of getting the best possible results.

There are many best practices for conducting a successful home search, and these include:

1. Define Your Homebuying Criteria

The definition of the "perfect" home varies from property buyer to property buyer. This means that your definition of the perfect home is unlikely to match that of a friend or family member.

Think about what separates an ordinary home from a can't-miss residence. Then, you'll be able to narrow your home search and map out a successful homebuying journey.

As you consider the perfect home, make a list of homebuying "must-haves." For example, if you want a garage where you and your wife can park your cars, a two-car garage is a homebuying must-have. Or, if you want a home that's close to high-quality schools that your kids can attend, buying a house in a great school district is a must.

2. Get Home Financing

Although your ultimate goal is to acquire a top-notch residence, you'll likely need financing to help you transform your homebuying dream into a reality. Fortunately, many banks and credit unions are available to teach you about a wide range of mortgage options.

Meet with several banks and credit unions – you'll be glad you did. These lenders can educate you about the different types of home loans and help you get pre-approved for a mortgage.

After you receive pre-approval for a mortgage, you're good to kick off your home search. In fact, with a mortgage in hand, you can tailor your search to homes that fall within a specific price range.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

Regardless of your homebuying goals, it pays to work with a real estate agent. That way, you can receive expert assistance as you search for houses in various cities and towns.

A real estate agent is happy to teach you the ins and outs of purchasing a house. By doing so, this housing market professional can help you become a real estate expert in no time at all.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will set up home showings, keep you up to date about new houses that become available and help you submit home offers. This housing market professional is committed to your homebuying success and will do whatever it takes to assist you along the homebuying journey.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is available to respond to any homebuying questions that you may have. No homebuying question is ever too big or too small for a real estate agent, and as a result, this housing market professional will make it simple for you to make an informed homebuying decision.

Launch a successful home search today – use the aforementioned best practices, and you can increase the likelihood of discovering your dream home.


There’s few things in life that are more exciting than closing on your first house. All of the money that you saved and the paperwork that you have filled out has finally come together so that you can now say you’re a proud homeowner. 


Before you start planning your housewarming party, there’s a few things that you need to do with your new home and its contents.


Copy The Closing Paperwork


Undoubtedly, there were dozens of pieces of paper that were handed to you during the closing on your new home. You should have an extra copy of everything that was signed. While the local registrar of deeds probably has a copy of everything filed there as well, it’s always a good idea to have extra copies of these papers.


Lock The Doors With New Keys


You’ll need to change the locks when you move into a new home as soon as possible. Many different people had the keys to the home while it was still on the market. Also, before the home was even put up for sale, family members could have passed sets of keys amongst family and friends. The lock category also includes securing sliding doors, electrical boxes, and windows accordingly. 


Put Your Name On It


You’ll need to place your name on a variety of things including your mailbox, the trashcans, the buzzer, and anything else that is property of you and your new home. If it won’t pose a privacy issue for you, it’s better to claim what’s rightfully yours early on to ease confusion. 



Put Up Curtains Or Cover The Windows


There’s probably 1,000 other things that you would rather do when you move into a new home than put up some curtains. Yet, this is so important to your privacy. Without curtains or window treatments, all of your home and its contents are exposed for the outside world to see. Until you have a chance to settle in, you can even use boxes or towels to cover the windows. This is used initially for a security measure to deter thieves and nosy neighbors.


Meet The New Neighbors


It‘s a good idea to know who is living around you. For one, you’ll be aware of any suspicious activity that’s happening in case you see strange people hanging around the area. It’s good to know who you live next to and what you might have in common with them. At the very least, you’ll have a new friend. They might even water your plants while you’re away on your next vacation. 


Don’t forget to change your addresses as well. That’s always one of the biggest hassles about moving. Take the right measures for safety and comfort when you move into your new home for a smooth transition


Attending an open house is a great way to learn a great deal about a home in a relatively short amount of time. It allows you to see inside the home with your own eyes, enabling you to notice details that are omitted in photos, whether it’s a noisy neighborhood or a smelly basement.

Aside from learning about the home, an open house is also an opportunity to help real estate agents learn about you. Being prepared and professional at an open house could set you apart from other, more casual, attendees helping you make a good impression.

Since most of us don’t attend open houses on the regular, and since there probably isn’t an Open House Etiquette 101 course you can take at your local college, it can be difficult to know exactly how to prepare for an open house. How should you dress? Should you take notes? Is it rude to take photos? Which questions are welcome and which should be avoided?

In this article, we’ll help demystify the open house, leaving you more prepared to leave a positive impression when you go to see what could potentially be your future home.

Appearance

How should you dress when attending an open house? An open house is neither a funeral nor a trip to the beach. The realtor showing the house likely isn’t a fashion critic-they’re there to answer your questions.

In most cases, casual clothing is appropriate. Since you’ll be touring the house and yard, however, you might want to avoid heels.

Questions and conversation

An open house is your time to learn all of the relevant facts about a house. Good questions to ask include upgrades to the house, how many offers it has received, and the current owner’s timeline (when they want or need to close by).

There are other topics you’ll want to avoid. Don’t ask too many personal questions about the sellers. It will make the real estate agent, understandably, uncomfortable. Also be sure not to reveal too many details about yourself. You don’t want to mention things like your spending limit as this will remove some of your powers of negotiation.

It’s okay if the furniture and decorations in the home aren’t your taste, but it’s a bad idea to criticize these items as you tour the house, as you may offend the agent or owners who have decorated.

Being respectful of the owner's’ space

Even though the house is for sale, it’s still someone’s home. It’s inadvisable to bring food or drinks without a secure cap into an open house.

We live in a time when everyone photographs and shares everything. But avoid the temptation to take photos when you’re at an open house. Would you want someone going through your home, taking pictures of your valuables, and then sharing them online? Instead, refer back to photos that are available online or from the agent.

When it comes to touring the house, all of the rooms should be viewable. In fact, if there’s a room you can’t enter for any reason this should raise a red flag that something is wrong with the home. However, just because you should look in the closets to get an idea of space doesn’t mean you should touch or go through the personal belongings of the homeowner.


Follow all of the above open house tips and you’ll be sure to leave a good impression.


Getting ready to buy a home is one of the most exciting times in life. The purchase of a home is one of the biggest financial decisions that you will ever make in your lifetime. When you make the decision to buy a home. There are a few key things that you need to do to be prepared for the process of a property purchase. It can be simple if you have the right preparation and knowledge.


Find The Right Realtor


A good realtor will steer you in the right direction when it comes to finding the home of your dreams. Your real estate agent also will help you each step of the way on the road to buying that home. There’s a lot of paperwork that must be done in a timely manner throughout the buying process. The right realtor can even help you to get the offer in for the right home in on time. In a competitive market, having a realtor who is on top of things can mean the difference between purchasing the home you want and letting it fall through the cracks.


Know That You’re Signing A Lot Of Legal Paperwork


The purchase of a home does involve a contract. If you need more time for anything such as reviewing your home inspection or waving certain contingencies, you’ll need to state that. Every piece of the transaction is important and needs to be formally processed when it comes to purchasing a home. Your realtor will be there to help you through all of these complicated processes. 


Think Of The Future


When you’re choosing a home, you’re not just buying for your life as it stands right now. Are you hoping to have a big family? Do you need a home office? How much entertaining are you planning on doing? All of these things are important when it comes to the type of home that you’ll buy. If you don’t plan for the future, you’ll outgrow the home that you’re in quite quickly. 


Look For Potential


See what potential the homes that you’re looking at have for you. Some homes may have major cosmetic issues that can easily be fixed. Perhaps The walls just need some fresh coast of paint. Maybe the deck needs to be stained. If you go into the house search with an open mind, it will be a lot easier for you to find the right home. You don’t need a home that is absolutely move-in-ready unless of course, you’re building a brand new home from scratch.


Know Your Finances


One of the most important things about buying a home is knowing your finances. Don’t buy a home that you can‘t afford. From looking at your own budget to getting pre-approved, you’ll be able to have a better understanding of your own financial situation and how much house you can afford.




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